Paternalism in the Jim Crow Essay

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24-7-custom-writing-service Paternalism in the Jim Crow Assignment

Paternalism in the Jim Crow Paper

 

 

Paternalism refers to the interference of an individual’s state and freedoms by a different party, against this individual’s will, based on the claim that the individual facing the interference is protected from harm or better off. In the contemporary society, paternalism can be observed in the restrictions provide by the law such as the wearing of seatbelts and antidrug legislation. During the Jim Crow era, paternalism was dominant, even as the oppression of blacks was constituted and blessed by the law through segregation laws. As much as the Civil War was meant to end the oppression of blacks in the south, if failed to liberate them from the oppression by whites and to create a sense of equality. With blacks having little access to employment, most remained employed as domestics by white employers. The tension between the whites and the blacks persisted during the Jim Crow period, with the black employees being looked down upon by their employers.

One of the ways through which paternalism was evident throughout this period was through the segregation that had been embedded into the law. Even though the black domestics worked for the whites and handled most if not all of their chores, they continued to be treated as slaves as opposed to servants. They were not allowed to interact with the whites or to use the same resources that their masters used. In a Vinella Byrd’s narrative, her employer did not allow her to use the wash pan to wash her hands as he did not consider her an equal (Wormer, Jackson III and Sudduth). In a different story by Annie Pearl Stevenson, she narrates that her employer had forbidden black servants from entering the house via the front door as they were not adequate enough to earn that “right” (Wormer, Jackson III and Sudduth). As much as the work that was carried out by the black domestics was integral in the lives of the whites, considering the southern norms, they were viewed as insignificant by their masters and the white community at large......................GET A PLAGIARISM FREE COPY