Criminalization of HIV/AIDS Paper

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24-7-custom-writing-serviceCriminalization of HIV/AIDS Essay

Criminalization of HIV/AIDS Assignment

 

The push to criminalize HIV/AIDS transmission and exposure is often based on the need to respond to serious concerns regarding the rapid spread of the disease in many nations, coupled with the inability to effectively provide HIV prevention efforts. While the response is legitimate, there is no factual evidence that HIV/AIDS criminalization has resulted in the reduction of the spread of the virus. This essay argues that the criminalization of HIV/AIDS is unjust and a representation of the social stigma carried forward by the society for years since the emergence of the disease.

            Firstly, applying criminal law to curb the spread and exposure to HIV/AIDS does not reduce or prevent its spread. Measures to slow the epidemic amongst a vast number of individuals include avoiding unsafe sex, sharing syringes, and other sexual risk behaviors. Additionally, the prison system does not recognize the importance of condoms and sterilizing injection equipment (Lazzarini, Galletly, Mykhalovskiy, Harsono, O’Keefe, Singer & Levine, 2013). It also does not prevent the occurrence of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Hence, the virus can easily spread in the prisons as it does in the general public. However, it is appropriate for a person with the virus, such as Musser in the case, to inform the sexual partner about his status. But, also in his case, the sexual contact did not lead to the spread of the illness because of the use of protection. There was also a smaller chance of HIV/AIDS contamination since Musser was under treatment.

Secondly, the application of the law undermines prevention efforts and the end of HIV stigmatization and oppression. The application of the criminal law could prevent people from coming forward, being tested, and receiving treatment. The possibility of criminal penalties may discourage a person to gain awareness of his or her status or disclose it to the partner. It could; therefore, impede HIV/AIDS prevention efforts and negatively affect the quality of care and .............GET A PLAGIARISM FREE COPY