The Jungle- Book Analysis

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24-7-custom-writing-serviceThe Jungle- Book Critique

The Jungle -Book Review

 

 

            Isabel Gonzalez Diaz dissects the use of propaganda by Upton Sinclair in his book “The Jungle” that is a representation of the struggles of immigrants in the United States and the emergence of socialism in the early 20th century. Diaz’s article titled “Whose Chicago, Anyway? “Aesthetics” vs. “Propaganda” in Upton Sinclair’s Ending of the Jungle” was written in 1996. The main premise of the article is conceptualizing the ending of Sinclair’s novel not as a political issue, but as an artistic aspect. Hence, Diaz views Sinclair as an artist who conjured up an ending that was both captivating and influential for the readers to shift their stance in political matters.

            The author argues that Sinclair represented socialism as the hope for immigrants for a better community in Chicago that was more accommodating to their needs and suffering. Sinclair wanted the immigrants to shun individualism and capitalism. Jurgis the main character of the novel lost himself in individualism and capitalism by embracing the dark, violent life of poverty and crime. However, in the end, after acknowledging socialism, Sinclair characterizes Jurgis as “a new man who had been born” and a person whose “whole world had been changed for him” (Diaz 98).

            Diaz supports her thesis by incorporating quotes and examples from Sinclair’s final chapters where he depicts the conversion of the protagonist. For instance, Diaz shows how Jurgis was smitten with wonder after discovering socialism in the following quote from the Jungle, “There was an unfolding of vistas before him, an upheaving, a stirring, a trembling: he felt ..............GET A PLAGIARISM FREE COPY